Jacob: February 2008 Archives

And speaking of relationships


My friend and former Dennis Miller Live co-worker Leah--one of the funniest people I know--is a regular contributor to a site called The Mad As Hell Club. I thought her latest entry made a nice counterpart to Mike's Guide To Dating A Nice Dude.

Mike's Rules for Dating Nice Dudes


I can attest that my brother-in-law Mike is a genuine Nice Guy.

And fortunately for you Nice Gals who wonder how you can meet and date a Nice Guy, Mike has written Mike's Rules for Dating Nice Dudes. It deserves to be one of those blog posts that ends up getting linked to and passed around endlessly, and it probably will be, so read it now and you can tell everybody you read it before it was famous.

Headline News


The Brits are following the US presidential elections with intense interest. Here, for example, is how The London Paper covered the Super Tuesday results last week:

If you look closely, you'll note that Hillary and Barack were deemed sufficiently important to push full coverage of the Spice Girls reunion off the front page; greater honour cannot England grant. (Admittedly, troubled singer Amy Winehouse got a much larger front-page photo than any American candidate, but until Barack and Hillary have spouses in jail on charges of assault and trial fixing, they're going to have to settle for second place.)

I suspect there are a number of reasons for the intense interest in our race. For one thing, most Europeans find it soothing to think ahead to a time when Bush will no longer be president.

For another, it's simply a good story, pitting an underdog against a famous name, and the fact that it's an equal contest is a surprise to many. Long before this election cycle began, the Brits I spoke to seemed to take it for a given that Hillary Clinton would be our next president. It's only recently that they've realized that the Clintons are not as unambiguously admired in America as they are abroad.

But the main reason for the interest in our election is simply this: the rest of the world know they'll be directly affected by America's choice, and lacking a vote, the only thing they can do is follow the race.

Last Restaurant Standing


One of our favorite British TV shows of last year was The Restaurant, a sort of foody version of The Apprentice. In place of Donald Trump was the vastly more-likable French chef Raymond Blanc.

Alas, our American friends have been unable to see the show--until now. It's airing on BBC America under the name Last Restaurant Standing, starting on February 12.

If you get BBC America, I highly recommend it.